Science Panel

Beyond Science and Decisions: From Issue Identification to Dose-Response Assessment

Standing Panel

Richard Beauchamp, Texas Department of State Health Services
James S. Bus,The Dow Chemical Company
Mike Dourson, Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment (TERA)
R. Jeffrey Lewis, ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Inc.
Annie Jarabek
, U.S. EPA National Center for Environmental Assessment
Bette Meek, University of Ottawa
Greg Paoli, Risk Sciences International

Ad Hoc Panelists

Barbara Beck, Gradient
Janet Anderson (Hess-Wilson), U.S. Air Force
Michael Bolger, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Stephen Edwards, U.S. EPA NHEERL
Penelope Fenner-Crisp, Retired (former ILSI and former EPA)
Sue Griffin, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Mike Jayjock, Jayjock Associates
Asish Mohapatara, Health Canada
Martha Moore, U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Lorenz Rhomberg, Gradient
John Christopher, Independent Toxicologist and Risk Assessor
Joel Tickner, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
Daniel Villeneuve, U.S. EPA NHEERL

 

Past Panelists

Michael Bolger, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
John Christopher, Independent Toxicologist and Risk Assessor
Rory Conolly, U.S. EPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory
Adam M. Finkel, University of Pennsylvania Law School
William Hayes, Indiana Department of Environmental Management
Randall O. Manning, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division
Paul Moyer, Minnesota Department of Health (MDH)
Rita Schoeny, U.S. EPA Office of Water
Alan Stern, State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

 

Panelist Bios

 

Janet Andersen, Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment (AFCEE)

Janet Anderson (maiden name: Hess-Wilson) Ph.D. is a human health toxicologist and environmental risk assessor for the Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment (AFCEE), Technical Support Division, San Antonio, Texas.  She is also the Program Manager for the AFCEE Emerging Issues and Contaminants Program.  Her duties involve providing toxicology expertise and oversight of risk assessments executed under the Air Force Environmental Restoration Program’s CERCLA and RCRA activities; conducting high-level technical review of federal and state agency toxicology and risk assessments on behalf of the Department of Defense; providing technical oversight of environmental remediation research projects related to emerging environmental contaminants;  and lastly, briefing senior Air Force management on changes in chemical toxicity standards and regulations that may impact Air Force environmental programs.  Prior to joining AFCEE, Janet was a post doctoral fellow for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Research and Development National Center for Environmental Assessment in Cincinnati, OH.  While with the EPA, she served as chemical manager for numerous EPA chemical assessments and as a team member for several Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) assessments.  She gained first-hand knowledge of EPA Risk Assessment Guidance and policies, as well as how to conduct hazard identification, dose-response assessment, and the derivation of toxicity values to protect human health.  Dr. Anderson earned her Ph.D. in molecular and cancer biology from the University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine with a specialty in endocrine disrupting chemicals.  Her experience in molecular biology techniques and “omics” is carried over into her interests in the application of bioinformatics and “omic” information into the risk assessment standard of practice.  She is currently a member of the Society of Toxicology and continues to publish in the scientific peer-reviewed literature.

 

Richard Beauchamp, Texas Department of State Health Services

Richard A. Beauchamp is the Senior Medical Toxicologist for the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) with responsibility for providing advanced toxicological and risk assessment support for the Exposure Assessment, Surveillance, and Toxicology (EAST) Group.  As cooperative agreement partners with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Dr. Beauchamp and other EAST Group members are tasked with conducting Public Health Assessments at abandoned hazardous waste sites that are proposed and added to the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) National Priority List (NPL) of Superfund sites in Texas. Dr. Beauchamp is also involved with conducting other medical and toxicological Public Health Consultations involving exposures to environmental hazardous substances.

After earning his medical degree at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (1973‐1977), Dr. Beauchamp completed a three year pediatric residency with the Austin Pediatric Education Program at Brackenridge Hospital in Austin, Texas (1977‐1980) and began working at the Texas Department of Health as a Public Health Physician Epidemiologist (1980). Early in his career at the health department, he was tasked with developing risk assessment expertise that would be essential for the newly‐formed Environmental Epidemiology Program in the evaluation of environmental and chemical exposures. With an undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering (U.T. Austin) and a strong background in mathematics and computer sciences, Dr. Beauchamp has applied the knowledge gained through participation at numerous risk assessment conferences, symposia, and seminars (sponsored by EPA, NGA, CDC, ASTHO, NIOSH, and others) to the development of his so‐called “Risk Assessment Toolkit.” Dr. Beauchamp’s toolkit consists of a series of Excel® spreadsheets designed for the flexible and rapid evaluation of cancer and non‐cancer risks resulting from exposures to a wide variety of environmental contaminants through all of the common exposure pathways. Risks are calculated incrementally using age‐specific exposure parameters, including body weights, body surface areas, respiratory daily volumes, and EPA’s early‐life exposure factors. Risks are integrated over the exposure duration, using up to 46 different age intervals, to insure that childhood exposures are appropriately addressed.

 

Barbara Beck, Gradient

Dr. Beck is expert in toxicology and in human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals, especially metals and air pollutants. For her projects at Gradient, she has performed site-specific and chemical-specific risk assessments, and developed exposure and risk assessment methodologies for multiple chemicals. Dr. Beck has worked on risk assessment issues regarding arsenic for over 25 years. Her projects on arsenic have included: development of a probabilistic exposure model; performing a mode of action analysis on arsenic carcinogenicity, particularly with respect to the role of cytotoxicity; and evaluating the potential role of arsenic on cardiovascular disease in US populations, considering mode of action issues. Before joining Gradient, she was Chief of Air Toxics Staff for US EPA Region I. Prior to that she was a Fellow in the Interdisciplinary, Programs in Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She has a Ph.D. in molecular biology and microbiology from Tufts University and an A.B. in biology from Bryn Mawr College. Dr. Beck also holds certifications from the American Board of Toxicology, the Academy of Toxicological Sciences and the UK Register of Toxicologists. She is at present a Visiting Scientist in the Department of Environmental Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Michael Bolger, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Dr. Bolger received his bachelor’s degree in biology in 1971 from Villanova University and his doctoral degree in physiology and biophysics in 1976 from Georgetown University.  After a three year postdoctoral position at the Georgetown University Medical Center, Dr. Bolger became a staff fellow in toxicology with the Bureau of Foods in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).  Upon completion of his staff fellowship, he accepted a position as a toxicologist with the Contaminants Branch at the FDA.  Since 1980 Dr. Bolger has been involved in the hazard/safety/risk assessment of anthropogenic and naturally derived contaminants in food.  Dr. Bolger is a board-certified toxicologist by the American Board of Toxicology. Dr. Bolger is the recipient of the 2009 Arnold J. Lehman Award conferred by the Society of Toxicology and the 2010 Outstanding Risk Practitioner Award conferred by the Society of Risk Analysis.  Dr. Bolger is currently director of the Chemical Hazards Assessment Staff in the Office of Food Safety which is responsible for the hazard/safety/risk assessment of food borne contaminants, and for reporting FDA monitoring efforts on food-borne environmental contaminants and the conduct of exposure assessments.  Dr. Bolger is currently serving as a food safety expert of the World Health Organization and as a member of the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives and the Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group of the World Health Organization.

James S. Bus, The Dow Chemical Company

James S. Bus is the Director of External Technology, Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting at The Dow Chemical Company (1989-present).  He previously held positions as Associate Director of Toxicology and Director of Drug Metabolism at The Upjohn Company (1986-1989), Senior Scientist at the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT, 1977-1986), and Assistant Professor of Toxicology, University of Cincinnati (1975-1977).  Dr. Bus currently participates in several external institutions including the Board of Directors of The Hamner Institutes (formerly CIIT) and the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (BEST).  He has also has served as Chair of the American Chemistry Council and International Council of Chemical Associations Long-Range Research Initiatives; the USEPA Chartered Science Advisory Board (2003-2009); and the FDA National Center for Toxicological Research Science Advisory Board (2004-2010). He serves as an Associate Editor of Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology,and on the Editorial Boards of Environmental Health Perspectives andDose Response. Dr. Bus is a member of the Society of Toxicology (serving as President in 1996-97), the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, the American Conference of Governmental and Industrial Hygienists, and the Teratology Society. He is a Diplomate and Past-President of the American Board of Toxicology and a Fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences (member of Board of Directors, 2008-present; Vice-President and President-Elect, 2010).  Dr. Bus received the Society of Toxicology Achievement Award (1987) for outstanding contributions to the science of toxicology; the Society of Toxicology Founders Award (2010) for leadership fostering the role of toxicology in improving safety decisions; Rutgers University Robert A. Scala Award (1999) for exceptional work as a toxicologist in an industry laboratory; and the K.E. Moore Outstanding Alumus Award (Michigan State University, Dept. Pharmacol. And Toxicol.).  He received his B.S. in Medicinal Chemistry from the University of Michigan (1971) and Ph.D in pharmacology from Michigan State University (1975) and currently is an Adjunct Professor in the Dept. Pharmacology and Toxicology at that institution.  His research interests include mechanisms of oxidant toxicity, defense mechanisms to chemical toxicity, relationship of pharmacokinetics to expression of chemical toxicity, and general pesticide and industrial chemical toxicology.  He has authored/co-authored over 100 publications, books, and scientific reviews.

 

John Christopher, Independent Toxicologist and Risk Assessor

John Christopher is a TERA Fellow and independent consultant who assists clients in the public and private sectors in (1) assessing and managing chemical risks to human health and the environment for hazardous waste cleanup; and (2) dose-response issues for individual chemicals and classes of chemicals.  His principal research interests are methods for removing uncertainties from dose-response assessment of environmental toxicants and bioavailability of metals in soil.  John retired in 2010 as Staff Toxicologist Emeritus after 22 years with the Department of Toxic Substances Control, California Environmental Protection Agency.  In this position he reviewed, critiqued, and approved assessments of risk to human health and ecological risk assessments at military facilities and other hazardous waste sites and permitted facilities in California.  He constructed multi-pathway risk assessments to identify numerical criteria for classifying hazardous levels of metals and organic chemicals in waste.  He also used Monte Carlo methods in various exposure settings to identify levels protective of human health.  He received various awards for contributions to waste cleanup at military bases in California.  Dr. Christopher was a senior scientist and risk assessor for CH2M Hill, ICF Kaiser Engineers, and IT Corporation.  He conducted safety testing in animals for Ralston Purina, Midwest Research Institute, and North American Science Associates.   Dr. Christopher earned a B.S in Biology from Georgetown University, Washington DC, and a M.A. in Pharmacology from Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA.  He received his Ph.D. in Biological Science from Oregon State University, Corvallis OR.   Dr. Christopher is a Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology and a former member of this Board.  He has served as President in the Risk Assessment Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology and also in SOT’s Northern California Chapter.  John is currently (2012-2014) Counselor for the Dose-Response Specialty Group of the Society for Risk Analysis.  He is a peer reviewer for Toxicological Sciences, Risk Analysis, Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, and CRC Critical Reviews in Toxicology.  John received a Lifetime Achievement Award in 2007 from the University of Massachusetts for his contributions from government to cleanup of hazardous waste.

Rory Conolly, U.S. EPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory

Rory Conolly is a Senior Research Biologist in the Integrated Systems Toxicology Division of the U.S EPA’s National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.  His major research interests are (1) biological mechanisms of dose‑response and time-course behaviors, (2) the use of computational modeling to study these mechanisms and, (3) the application of computational models to quantitative dose-response assessment.  Dr. Conolly received the U.S. Society of Toxicology’s (SOT) Lehman Award for lifetime achievement in risk assessment in 2005.  He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology from 2004 until joining the EPA in 2005, President of the SOT Biological Modeling Specialty Section (2000 – 2001), President of the SOT Risk Assessment Specialty Section (1997 ‑ 1998), a member of the SOT Risk Assessment Task Force (1998 – 2000) and is currently a Councilor with the Risk Assessment Specialty Section.  He is Adjunct Professor of Biomathematics at North Carolina State University, Faculty Affiliate, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University and has four times received awards from the SOT Risk Assessment Specialty Section (1991, 1999, 2003, 2004).  Dr. Conolly was born in London, England and raised in Canada and the United States.  He received a bachelor’s degree in biology from Harvard College in 1972, a doctorate in physiology/toxicology from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1978, and spent a post-doctoral year at the Central Toxicology Laboratory of Imperial Chemical Industries, PLC, in Cheshire, England.  He was a member of the Toxicology Faculty at The University of Michigan School of Public Health from 1979 through 1986, and worked with the U.S. Air Force Toxic Hazards Research Division, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio from 1986 until 1989.  In 1989 Dr. Conolly joined the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) and worked there until 2005, when he joined the U.S. EPA.

 

Mike Dourson, Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment (TERA)

Mike Dourson is the President of Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment (TERA), a nonprofit corporation dedicated to the best use of toxicity data in risk assessment. Before founding TERA in 1995, Dr. Dourson held leadership roles in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as chair of US EPA’s Reference Dose (RfD) Work Group, charter member of the US EPA’s Risk Assessment Forum and chief of the group that helped create the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).  Dr. Dourson received his Ph.D. in Toxicology from the University of Cincinnati.  He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology and a Fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences.  Dr. Dourson has served on or chaired numerous expert panels, including peer review panels for US EPA IRIS assessments, US EPA’s Risk Assessment Forum, TERA’s International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER) independent peer reviews and consultations, FDA’s Science Board Subcommittee on Toxicology, the NSF International’s Health Advisory Board, and SOT’s harmonization of cancer and non-cancer risk assessment.  He served as Secretary for the Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) and has held leadership roles in specialty sections of SRA and SOT.  He is currently on the editorial board of three journals.  Dr. Dourson has published more than 100 papers on risk assessment methods, has co-authored over 100 government risk assessment documents, and has made over 100 invited presentations.

 

Steve Edwards, US EPA

Stephen Edwards is a Systems Biologist within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (EPA-NHEERL) in Research Triangle Park, N.C. Dr. Edwards is the EPA lead for an international effort to develop an Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Knowledgebase, which is designed to house descriptions of the biological mechanisms underlying chemical toxicity in a structured manner. He is also leading an EPA effort to create computationallypredicted AOPs by integrating data from the published literature, omics databases, and HTS toxicity data. He serves as a senior advisor in the Office of Research and Development (ORD) on issues regarding the development of predictive toxicology models of disease using genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. With a combination of experimental and computational experience, Dr. Edwards also serves as a liaison with the EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) and has developed a flexible data management system to support systems biology research within the EPA. Dr. Edwards received his bachelor of science in chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his doctorate in pharmacology from Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Before joining the EPA, he served as a senior research scientist and research fellow at Rosetta Inpharmatics (Merck & Co.), in Seattle, Washington, a recognized leader in computational and systems approaches to drug development.

 

Penelope A. Fenner-Crisp

Dr. Fenner-Crisp currently has a consulting practice in Charlottesville, VA. Her areas of activity include development and application of principles of risk assessment and related science policy and the review and incorporation of toxicological and exposure information in chemical-specific assessments, with special emphasis on characterization of modes of action and their human relevance.

Dr. Fenner-Crisp served as the Executive Director of the ILSI Risk Science Institute (RSI) from 2000-2004, following a 22-year career with U.S. EPA in the Office of Pesticide Programs, the Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances, the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics and the Office of Drinking Water.

Dr. Fenner-Crisp completed a B.S. in Zoology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, an M.A. and Ph.D. in Pharmacology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and a postdoctoral fellowship at Georgetown University Schools of Medicine and Dentistry.

Dr. Fenner-Crisp is a member of the Society of Toxicology and Society for Risk Analysis (SRA), serving in various leadership positions. In 1996, she was the recipient of SRA’s first Risk Practitioner award. She has been a Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology since 1984, serving on its Board of Directors (2001-2005).

Dr. Fenner-Crisp has served as an Expert on WHO IPCS working groups charged with preparing chemical-specific and general issue human health documents, the WHO Panel of the Joint Meeting on Pesticide Residues and in activities related to the WHO IPCS project on Harmonization of Risk Assessment practices. She was the lead U.S. Delegate to the OECD’s Endocrine Disruptor Testing and Assessment workgroup and Mammalian Validation subgroup and to the Expert Consultation on Acute Toxicity. In April, 2000, she received the Fitzhugh Green Award, EPA’s highest award for contributions to its international activities. While at EPA, she served as the vice-chair of EPA’s Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Advisory Committee (1996-1998) and a member of EPA’s Endocrine Disruptor Methods Validation Subcommittee (2001-2004). Since retiring from EPA, she has served on a number of review and advisory panels sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences, public interest not-for-profits, the American Chemistry Council, EPA, FDA, and NTP. Currently, she is a member of the Science Integration in Decision-making Committee of EPA’s Science Advisory Board and the Board of Directors of GreenBlue, a not-for-profit organization based in Charlottesville, VA.

Adam M. Finkel, UMDNJ School of Public Health

Adam M. Finkel is one of the nation’s leading experts in the evolving field of quantitative risk assessment and cost-benefit analysis, with 25 years of experience improving methods of analysis and making risk-based decisions to protect workers and the general public from environmental hazards. Dr. Finkel is currently a Fellow at the Penn Law School and Executive Director of the Penn Program on Regulation; he is also a professor of environmental and occupational health at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) School of Public Health.  From 2004-2008, he was a Visiting Professor of Public and International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. From 1995 to 2003, he was Director of Health Standards Programs at the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and was responsible for promulgating and evaluating regulations to protect the nation’s workers from chemical, radiological, and biological hazards, and then served as OSHA’s Regional Administrator for the Rocky Mountain states. He recently received the David P. Rall Award from the American Public Health Association for “a career in advancing science in the service of public health protection.”  Adam has an Sc.D. in environmental health sciences from the Harvard School of Public Health, a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, an A.B. in biology from Harvard College, and is a Certified Industrial Hygienist.

 

Sue Griffin, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Dr. Susan Griffin has a doctorate in Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology from the University of California at Davis and is board certified by the American Board of Toxicology. She has worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for 25 years and is currently the Senior Toxicologist in EPA’s Region 8 Superfund program in Denver, CO. She has completed several hundred human health baseline risk assessments for hazardous waste sites listed on the National Priority List and endangerment assessments for emergency response actions in Colorado, Utah, South and North Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming. These assessments examined contaminants such as inorganics, volatile organic compounds, PCBs, dioxins, asbestos, and mineral fibers from multiple media and exposure pathways. She has also been involved in the design and conduct of bioavailability studies in juvenile swine to determine the bioavailability of lead and arsenic from soil contaminated by mining and smelting activities and is currently working on a collaborative research project to develop an in vitro benchtop method for assessing the bioavailability of arsenic from soil. In addition, she is actively involved in writing and developing national Superfund guidance documents, such as the Probabilistic Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund, the Superfund Guidance for Inhalation Risk Assessment, the Guidance Manual for the Integrated Exposure Biokinetic Uptake Model, and developing chemical toxicity values for EPA’s Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database as an IRIS consensus reviewer. She is a member of the Society of Toxicology and the American Society of Clinical Pathologists and is currently a consultant with the FDA on the Medical Devices Advisory Committee.

 

William Hayes, Indiana Department of Environmental Management

William Hayes has been a Senior Risk Assessor with the Indiana Department of Environmental Management for 14 years.  His career has included work in all of the major environmental programs.  Mr. Hayes is the Continuous Improvement Coordinator for the Office of Land Quality, is a Certified Industrial Hygienist, is the Office of Land Quality nanotechnology subject matter expert, and has several publications on environmental topics, including a book on the ISO 14000 standards.  His current work focuses on continuous improvement and the development of technical guidance.

 

Annie Jarabek, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Annie M. Jarabek is a senior toxicologist in the immediate office of the National Center for Environmental Assessment in the Office of Research and Development at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  Formally trained in inhalation toxicology, she also has significant experience with PBPK modeling and risk analysis.  She was principal author of the methods for derivation of inhalation reference concentrations and application of inhalation dosimetry.  Annie has worked on assessments or analysis methods across all media and routes of exposure, including several priority, interdisciplinary Agency assessments including ingested perchlorate, inhaled particulate matter, and asbestos.  Her current research efforts focus on multi-scale modeling and decision analysis. Annie has twice received awards for best manuscript in risk assessment application from the Risk Assessment Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology, along with several best abstract presentation awards.  She also received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the University of Massachusetts, the Risk Practitioner of the Year award from the Society of Risk Analysis, the Superfund National Notable Achievement Award, and several award medals representing all metals (gold, silver, and bronze) from the Agency.

 

Mike Jayjock, Jayjock Associates

Mike Jayjock has his own LLC (Jayjock Associates), he is also a Senior Analyst for The LifeLine Group. Mike has an M.S. and Ph.D. from Drexel University in Environmental Engineering & Science and he is board certified (ABIH) in the Comprehensive Practice of Industrial Hygiene. His primary research interest includes the development of better-estimating and more cost-efficient human exposure models. He has been active in the publication of his work and in participating on various committees of the EPA, International Society of Exposure Assessment, American Industrial Hygiene Association, the National Academy of Science and the European Union. He writes a weekly blog on Human Health Risk Assessment at: http://jayjock-associates.blogspot.com/

R. Jeffrey Lewis, ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Inc.

Jeffrey Lewis is a Senior Scientific Associate with ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Inc.   In this position, Dr. Lewis is responsible for providing support to ExxonMobil’s epidemiology and health risk assessment scientific programs.  He currently manages company scientific programs related to children’s health, emerging environmental health issues, legislative/regulatory affairs and regulatory impact analysis (e.g., benefit-cost analysis).  He has served on a number of industry trade association scientific committees, external science advisory boards (e.g., Peer Consultation panel for EPA’s Voluntary Children’s Chemical Evaluation Program), and is a member of ExxonMobil’s Occupational Exposure Limits committee.  Dr. Lewis also has an adjunct faculty appointment at the University of Texas School of Public Health and is currently Treasurer Elect of the Society for Risk Analysis.  Dr. Lewis received his Bachelors of Science degree in biology from the University of Kansas in 1985 and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of Texas School of Public Health in 1987 and 1990, respectively.  In addition, he earned a Masters in Business Administration from Rutgers University in 1997.

 

Bette Meek, McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa

Bette Meek has a background in toxicology receiving her M.Sc. in Toxicology (with distinction) from the University of Surrey, U.K. and her Ph.D. in risk assessment from the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands. She is currently the Associate Director of Chemical Risk Assessment at the McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, completing an interchange assignment from Health Canada. She has extensive experience in the management of chemical assessment programs within the Government of Canada, most recently involving development and implementation of process and methodology for the health assessment of Existing Substances under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) and previously, programs for contaminants in drinking water and air.

With colleagues within Canada and internationally, she has contributed to or led initiatives to increase transparency, defensibility and efficiency in health risk assessment, having convened and participated in initiatives in this area for numerous organizations including the International Programme on Chemical Safety, the World Health Organization, the International Life Sciences Institute, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences. Relevant areas have included frameworks for weight of evidence analysis including mode of action, chemical specific adjustment factors, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling, combined exposures and predictive modeling. She has also authored over 175 publications in the area of chemical risk assessment and received several awards for contribution in this domain.

 

Randall O. Manning, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division

Randall Manning has served as the Environmental Toxicology Coordinator for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division (EPD) since 1990.  In that role, Dr. Manning has worked with all of the media programs in EPD to encourage the use and consistency of current risk assessment approaches.  Dr. Manning worked extensively with the development of risk-based evaluations for the State Hazardous Site Response Act (state superfund program).  He has also worked with water quality programs, both related to water quality standards and fish tissue risk assessment approaches and advisories.  Dr. Manning has also worked with the state-wide air monitoring program in developing a monitoring network, and guidelines for evaluations of air toxics.  Dr. Manning received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Georgia.  He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology.

Asish Mohapatra, Health Canada

Asish Mohapatra is a Health Risk Assessment and Toxicology Specialist working for Health Canada (Prairies Region) Contaminated Sites group. He has 15 years of experience in the public and private sectors in the areas of life sciences, environmental public health sciences, chemical, biological and computational toxicology, human health risk assessment and management and remediation. Specifically, in the areas of chemical, biological and radiological toxicology and health risk assessments, he has worked as a expert reviewer of contaminated sites health risk assessment projects including issues pertaining to indoor and outdoor environmental quality. He has conducted uncertainty analysis, quantitative risk assessment modelling, and toxicological evaluations of chemical and biological and radiological stressors. He has been evaluating existing and emerging predictive tools, informatics technologies and mathematical models (e.g., semantic web technologies and data fusion tools) to effectively use them to analyze, disseminate, and share toxicological and health risk assessment data of complex chemical clusters from disparate sources under public health toxicology and risk assessment frameworks. Recent works included technical reference book publications in the areas of toxicology, toxicoinformatics and global chemical management, and collaborative work with several global agencies and multi-stakeholder groups and initiatives in the area of dose response techniques, predictive toxicology applications and system biology database and knowledge integration. He has a masters degree in Life Sciences, a pre-doctoral degree (master in philosophy) in Environmental Science with a specialization in industrial toxicology and hematotoxicology, and has completed several certificate level advanced training programs in environmental management, health risk analysis, case works in toxicology, environmental health leadership, and gene-environment interactions.

Martha Moore, National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR), Food and Drug Administration

Dr. Martha M. Moore is the Director of the Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR), Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, Arkansas.  Prior to her appointment at NCTR, Dr. Moore was the Chief of the Genetic and Cellular Toxicology Branch, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.  Dr. Moore received a BA degree in Biology from Western Maryland College, Westminster, Maryland and a Ph.D. in Genetics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She has served on numerous EPA, FDA and other Government Agency advisory groups and committees.  She is currently a member of the OECD Expert Workgroup for revising the Genetic Toxicology test guidelines and chairs the workgroup that is drafting a new OECD test guideline for in vitro gene mutation assays using the thymidine kinase locus.   She is a member of the Society of Toxicology, the Environmental Mutagen Society, the European Environmental Mutagen Society, the United Kingdom Environmental Mutagen Society, the Genotoxicity and Environmental Mutagen Society and the Genetic Toxicology Association.  Within SOT, Dr. Moore is a member of the Risk Assessment, Carcinogenesis, Regulatory and Safety Evaluation, and the Occupational and Public Health Specialty Sections.  Journals in which she has published include; Mutagenesis, Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, Mutation Research, Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, and Toxicological Science.   Her research interests include: (1) the development and utilization of mechanistically based in vitro and in vivo gene mutation assays (2) the interpretation and use of genetic toxicology data in cancer risk assessment and (3) the integration of rodent and human mutagenicity data in regulatory decision making.

Paul Moyer, Minnesota Department of Health (MDH)

Paul Moyer joined the Health Risk Assessment Unit of the Environmental Health Division of the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) in November 2006. As an environmental research scientist, he is responsible for performing and reviewing toxicological assessments of a variety of chemicals identified as groundwater contaminants as well as developing and applying risk assessment best practices to health protection policy decisions. The unit develops guidance values (upper exposure limits) for air and water contaminants. Paul leads staff in selecting chemicals for review for the purpose of developing state limits for groundwater and promulgating rules for the values that the unit develops. Paul also reviews the values that are developed for other programs in the unit (e.g., water contaminants of emerging concern) and has a leadership role in ensuring consistency between the methods used to develop air and water guidance. Paul has researched and developed health based guidance for a wide variety of agricultural and industrial chemicals that contaminate Minnesota ground water and surface water. Paul reviews the guidance values that others are developing for chemicals in personal care products and pharmaceuticals.  Before joining the Environmental Health Division, Mr. Moyer was the Chemical Emergency Response Coordinator for the MDH Public Health Laboratory Division. In this capacity his responsibilities included emergency preparedness and response planning, performing instrumental analyses for chemical agent exposure measurements in clinical matrices, and providing outreach to emergency response partners. Paul continues this work as an emergency response provider for radiological releases and drinking water supply contamination incidents.  Mr. Moyer received his B.S. in Microbiology from the University of Pittsburgh, and his M.S. in Environmental and Occupational health from the Graduate School of Public Health, also at the University of Pittsburgh. While living in Pennsylvania, Mr. Moyer worked in the areas of pharmaceutical analysis, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetic assessment, biomedical research, and chemical hazard communication and regulatory consultation.

 

Greg Paoli, Risk Sciences International

Greg Paoli serves as Principal Risk Scientist and COO at Risk Sciences International, a consulting firm specializing in risk assessment, management and communication in the field of public health, safety and risk-based decision-support.  Mr. Paoli has experience in diverse risk domains including toxicological, microbiological, and nutritional hazards, air and water quality, climate change impacts, medical and engineering devices, as well as emergency planning and response for natural and man-made disasters. He specializes in probabilistic risk assessment methods, the development of risk-based decision-support tools and comparative risk assessment.  Mr. Paoli has served on a number of expert committees devoted to the risk sciences. He was a member of the U.S. National Research Council committee that issued the 2009 report, Science and Decisions: Advancing Risk Assessment. He serves on the Canadian Standards Association Technical Committee on Risk Management, advisory committees of the National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy, a US NRC Standing Committee on the Use of Public Health Data at the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service, and has served on several expert committees convened by the World Health Organization.  Mr. Paoli completed a term as Councilor of the Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) and is a member of the Editorial Board of Risk Analysis. Recently, Mr. Paoli was awarded the Sigma Xi – SRA Distinguished Lecturer Award. He has provided training in risk assessment methods around the world, including the continuing education programs of the Harvard School of Public Health and the University of Maryland. Greg holds a Bachelors Degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Master’s Degree in Systems Design Engineering from the University of Waterloo.

Lorenz Rhomberg, Gradient

Lorenz R. Rhomberg Ph.D. FATS is a Principal at Gradient, a Cambridge, Massachusetts (USA), environmental consulting firm, where he specializes in critical review of toxicological information, human health risk assessment, and science policy issues for environmental and consumer chemical exposures. Before joining Gradient, Dr. Rhomberg was on the faculty of the Harvard School of Public Health. From 1984-1994, he was a risk assessor at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington. Dr. Rhomberg earned his Ph.D. in population biology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and an Honours B.Sc. in biology from Queen’s University in Ontario. His interests lie in methodology and science policy for quantitative risk analysis, including dose-response modeling, pharmacokinetic modeling and probabilistic methods, with special emphasis on cross-species extrapolation, chlorinated solvents and endocrine active agents. Dr. Rhomberg has served on several US National Academy of Sciences committees, and numerous review and advisory panels sponsored by government, trade associations, and professional societies. He is the author/editor of several books and more than 60 articles on risk analysis topics. He is a member of several scientific societies, including the Society of Toxicology and the Society for Risk Analysis, for which he is a past Councilor and a Past-President of the New England Chapter. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences and was awarded the Outstanding Practitioner of the year award in 2009 by the Society for Risk Analysis.

Rita Schoeny, U.S. EPA Office of Water

Rita Schoeny is Senior Science Advisor for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency=s Office of Water.  She received her B.S. in biology at the University of Dayton and a Ph.D. in microbiology from the School of Medicine of the University of Cincinnati.  After completing a postdoctoral fellowship at the Kettering Laboratory, Department of Environmental Health, she was appointed Assistant Professor in that department of the U.C. Medical School.  Dr. Schoeny has held several adjunct appointments and regularly lectures at colleges and universities on risk assessment. She has given lectures and courses on risk assessment in many areas of the world. Dr. Schoeny joined the U.S. EPA in 1986. Prior to her current position she was Associate Director of the Health and Ecological Criteria Division of the Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water. She has been responsible for major assessments and programs in support of the Safe Drinking Water Act, including scientific support for rules on disinfectant by-products, arsenic, microbial contaminants and the first set of regulatory determinations from the Contaminant Candidate List. She has held various positions in the Office of Research and Development including Chief of the Methods Evaluation and Development Staff, Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office, Cincinnati; Associate Director NCEA-Cin; and chair of the Agency-wide workgroup to review cancer risk assessments.  Dr.  Schoeny has published in the areas of metabolism and mutagenicity of PCBs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; assessment of complex environmental mixtures; health and ecological effects of mercury; drinking water contaminants; and principles and practice of human health risk assessment. She was a lead and coauthor of the Mercury Study Report to Congress and was a principal scientist and manager for Ambient Water Quality Criterion for Methylmercury. She has been the chair of an EPA working group on use of genetic toxicity data in determining mode of action for carcinogens.  She participates in many EPA scientific councils as well as national and international scientific advisory and review groups.  Current involvement includes panels on interpretation of DNA adduct data for risk assessment and evaluation of episodic and less-than-lifetime exposure to carcinogens. Dr.  Schoeny is the recipient of several awards including several U.S. EPA Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals; EPA=s Science Achievement Award for Health Sciences; the Greater Cincinnati Area Federal Employee of the Year Award; the University of Cincinnati Distinguished Alumnae Award; Staff Choice Award for Management Excellence; and the FDA Teamwork Award for publication of national advice on mercury-contaminated fish.

 

Alan Stern, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

Dr. Alan H. Stern is the Section Chief for Risk Assessment in the Office of Science of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection; Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey‐School of Public Health. He received a bachelor’s degree in biology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook (1975), a master’s degree in cellular and molecular biology from Brandeis University (1978), a master of public health degree (1981) and a doctorate in public health from the Columbia University School of Public Health (1987). Dr. Stern is board‐certified in toxicology by the American Board of Toxicology (Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology). Dr. Stern’s areas of expertise include risk assessment and exposure assessment including the application of probabilistic techniques to quantitative estimation of exposure and risk. His research interests have focused on heavy metals including lead, mercury, chromium and cadmium. Dr. Stern was a member of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Toxicology of Methylmercury (1999‐2000) and a member of the recent USEPA Science Advisory Board panel for the National‐Scale Mercury Risk Assessment for Coal‐ and Oil‐Fired Electrical Generating Units (June‐July 2011) as well as the USEPA Science Advisory Board Panel for Peer Review of the All‐Ages Lead Model (Oct. 27‐28, 2005). He has also served on numerous USEPA‐IRIS review panels including Toxicological Review of Urea (Dec. 13, 2010, Panel Chair), Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (Dec. 10, 2009, Panel Chair), Toxicological Review of 2‐Hexanone (May 22, 2008, Panel Chair), Toxicological Review of Toluene (Feb. 5, 2004, Panel Chair). Other panels, committees and workshops include, ATSDR Toxicological Profile Review of Revised Minimal Risk Levels (MRLs) for 1,4‐Dioxane (March‐April, 2010), ATSDR Toxicological Profile Review of Revised Inhalation MRL for 1,4‐ dioxane (Sept. 2011),.USEPA Panel for the Review of Draft Exposure Factors Handbook (March 3‐4, 2010), USEPA Workshop on Cardiovascular Toxicity of Methylmercury (Jan. 12‐13, 2010), USEPA Panel for Review of ―Dra􀅌 Child‐Specific Exposure Factors Handbook (Sept. 19‐20, 2007). Dr. Stern has authored numerous articles in peer‐reviewed journals, and contributed a book chapter on Exposure Assessment for Neurotoxic Metals in ―Human Developmental Neurotoxicology ‐ D. Bellinger, ed. (Taylor & Francis, New York, 2006.), and the article on Environmental Health Risk Assessmentin the Encyclopedia of Quantitative Risk Assessment and Analysis. John Wiley and Sons Ltd., 2008.

 

Joel Tickner, University of Massachusetts, Lowell

Dr. Joel Tickner is Associate Professor in the Department of Community Health and Sustainability at the University of Massachusetts Lowell where he also directs the Chemicals Policy and Science Initiative of the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production. He also directs the Green Chemistry and Commerce Council, a network of more than 70 companies and other organizations dedicated to accelerating the adoption of green chemistry across supply chains and sectors. He is an expert on chemicals regulation, regulatory science, and application of the alternatives assessment in science and policy. In particular, he has led efforts to build a scientific community of practice for alternatives assessment and has written extensively on alternatives assessment policy and practice. He served on the EPA’s National Pollution Prevention and Toxics Advisory Committee as well as National Academy of Sciences Panels on the Future of Science at the Environmental Protection Agency and the Design of Safer Chemical Alternatives. He holds a Masters of Science degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana and a Doctor of Science Degree from the Department of Work Environment at University of Massachusetts Lowell.

 

Dan Villeneuve, US EPA

Dr. Daniel L. Villeneuve is a research toxicologist at the US EPA Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED) in Duluth MN, USA. He earned a BS in Biology and Water Resources from the University of Wisconsin-Steven Point and a Ph.D. in Zoology/Environmental Toxicology from Michigan State University and has worked at MED since 2004. Dr. Villeneuve serves as a project lead for laboratory and field research aimed at the development adverse outcome pathway (AOP) knowledge and application of that knowledge to support regulatory toxicology. Dr. Villeneuve’s research is focused on the use of systems biology approaches and application of the AOP framework to extend fundamental understanding of the ways in which chemical stressors can interact with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG)-axis to produce reproductive toxicity in fish and other vertebrates. Dr. Villeneuve has over 15 years of experience conducting freshwater ecotoxicology research and has been recognized with 14 US EPA Scientific and Technological Achievement Awards, two Bronze Medal awards, and is a US National Academy of Sciences and Kavli Foundation Kavli Fellow. He has authored or co-authored over 130 peerreviewed papers in the field of ecotoxicology and serves as an associate editor of Environmental Beyond Science and Decisions: Work